Three Things I Wish I Knew at 22 By Brad Smith

An article good to read about things we should knew at 22 age. I fully copied it from Mr. Brad Smith. Click here for the article source, and connect to Mr. Brad Smith’s Linkedin network. Hope it useful for you!

thins we should now

Young people often ask me for advice about succeeding as they enter adulthood. It’s an insightful question, but I’m always reminded of the old joke, “why do adults ask young people what they want to be when they get older? Answer- because adults are still looking for a good answer ourselves!”. Once the surreal moment that I’m being asked a question about success subsides, I accept that there may be some value in the mistakes I’ve made and the experiences I’ve lived. To frame my response, I try to answer by thinking about what I know now, and what I wish I had known when I was 22.  While the world has dramatically changed since “my day”, I believe some things have withstood the test of time, and remain worth considering for those trying to find their place in the world.

If I could whisper in the ear of my 22-year-old self, here’s what I’d share:

  • It’s not about me. It’s about we. Be ready to combine your strengths and overcome weaknesses to solve issues together. Life is a team sport, and a player who makes the team great is far more valuable than simply a great player. Successful individuals play for a cause greater than themselves, and never for individual achievement. Working together, teams and great team players create the best outcomes.
  • Always be a learner: It’s more important to have a high Curiosity Quotient, or CQ, than a high IQ. We all remain a work-in-process. I encourage tomorrow’s leaders to fall in love with the problem, and not their own solution. To achieve this, be curious enough to seek inspiration from outside. This can be achieved by asking yourself three questions: (1) Who has solved a similar problem outside our industry or company, and what can I learn from their experience? (2) Who has attempted to solve this problem in our industry or company, and what can I learn from them? (3) What are at least three ideas I have considered before selecting my final recommendation, and can I explain to others why I believe this is the best solution? Then lean in and accept the reality that both failure and success offer a chance to learn. As Anatole France once said, “I prefer the errors of enthusiasm to the indifference of wisdom”.
  • Volunteer for the job that no one else wants: By taking on the most difficult and unwanted assignments, you’ll stretch yourself and grow more than staying within your comfort zone. Every company has something that no one wants to do. Stepping up makes you stand out from others and builds your reputation as the invaluable go-to person.

    Technology alone will not provide all the answers. It starts with people – and it’s important for millennials – and the rest of us as well – to realize that the biggest victories belong to those who see the value of “we” more than “me.”

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